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April 22, 2016

The Art of Cupping

Filed under: Tea and Health,Tea Classes,Tea Culture,Tea Enjoyment — wbwingert @ 10:05 am

Just like wine connoisseurs, tea aficionados appreciate the differences in flavor and aroma of the over 3000 different tea varieties.

While some tea-drinkers prefer the consistency of a blend, such as English Breakfast, others enjoy the fluctuations in character of a single origin tea, which is influenced by seasonal changes, early or late harvest, elevation and soil quality.

Regardless of our preference, the tea quality is very important and experienced tea tasters spent countless hours evaluating the leave style, aroma and taste of teas. What the “nose” is to the perfume industry, the “tea taster” is to the tea industry.

Tea tasting, or cupping, is a very structured process during which the quality of the dry and infused leaf is examined, as well as the color and aroma of the liquor and finally the taste of the infusion.

 

  1. For the cupping process, the leaves are placed in a container and lined up in a long row on the tasting bench. The taster weighs a specific amount of each tea and puts it in a special small brewing vessel. Sometimes this is a lidded mug (Gaiwan) or a small porcelain teapot. The brewing vessels are always white so that the color of the infusion is easier to assess.
  2. Boiling water for black teas, and slightly cooler water for green and white teas, is poured over the leaves which are than allowed to steep for 3-6 minutes depending on the varietal.
  3. After the steeping, the infusion is poured into tasting bowls and the infused leave is collected on the lid of the brewing mug.
  4. Like a wine taster, the tea taster slurps the tea into his mouth which is quite a noisy affair, but necessary because the tea needs to hit all taste buds to unfold its character.

 

Tea tasters taste hundreds of samples of different teas from different estates regions and seasons every day. In fact, it takes a long time to become a professional in this art. At least five years of training are needed before becoming a tea master, however even after many decades of tasting, these tea masters will tell you that they are still learning and honing their skills.

 

 

March 28, 2015

The Toxic Side of Beauty

Filed under: herbals and fruit blends,Tea and Health,Tea Classes — wbwingert @ 3:35 pm

Today, more and more people realize the importance of a healthy diet and especially wholesome and healthy nutrition. They pay attention to the quality of their food, buy organically grown produce, read labels and hold the food industry to higher standards by refusing to buy products with harmful ingredients; the cosmetic industry is still flying under the radar of government agencies and the public eye.

Beauty, however, is more than skin deep and reading labels can open your eyes to the dangers lurking in today’s beauty products. From lead in lipsticks to the phthalates and parabens in your baby’s lotion, the list of toxic and health-damaging ingredients is long and expands daily

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Did you know that the average woman uses a dozen personal care products, containing 168 chemicals, 89% of which have never been tested for the safety of their ingredients. (Uricchio, 2010)

While the The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is charged with the oversight of cosmetics, it has no authority to require pre-market safety assessments. It can neither review and regulate what goes into cosmetics, nor can it recall products that are found to be harmful.

 

The top five harmful chemicals most commonly found in popular beauty products are lead, formaldehyde, parabens, phthalates and nitrosamines.

 

Lead is a toxic heavy metal and can be found in whitening toothpastes and lipsticks. The negative effects of lead exposure are well documented and reach from neuro-toxicity, seizures, gastrointestinal issues to reproductive and kidney dysfunction

Formaldehyde, another frequently used ingredient, is absorbed transdermally or by inhalation and can be found in nail polishes, shampoos and liquid body soaps. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, excessive and prolonged exposure can cause skin rashes and may contribute to the development of cancer.

Parabens are most often used as preservatives and found in body creams, lotions, shampoos as well as any beauty product that has water added to it. Parabens have been shown to disrupt hormones, cause skin reactions and have even been found in breast cancer tumors.

Phthalates are in a class of chemicals that has been linked to hormone disruption, which can affect development and fertility.

Nitrosamines can be found in almost every skin care product, in baby shampoos, mascara, and concealer. You won’t, however find them listed because they are classified as impurities not as ingredients. Many studies link nitrosamine to cancer and in 1996, the FDA suggested cosmetic manufacturers remove ingredients from their products that, when combined, create nitrosamine, but this suggestion has largely been ignored.

These are only a few on the long list of harmful and potentially dangerous chemicals that beauty products expose us to and while the cosmetic industry argues that these toxic ingredients are absorbed in such small amounts that they do not pose any danger, it is the repeated use and thereby cumulative effect of exposure over a lifetime as well as the timing of exposure such as during growth and development, that increases their harmful effects.

Europe takes a hazard-base, precautionary approach when it comes to potentially harmful chemicals and has banned 1100 ingredients from cosmetics, while the United States has banned or restricted only 11. Ironically, U.S. companies selling their products overseas have changed their formulas to comply with European regulations while still using controversial ingredients in products meant for the U.S. market.

Organizations such as cosmeticsinfo.org provide consumers with factual, scientific information on ingredients most commonly used in cosmetics and personal care products.

 

Trusting Mother Nature, I have been making many of skin care products myself. It really is not all that difficult to make lip balms, shampoos and lotions. If you are curious and would like to find out, how you can create the perfect moisturizer for your skin type, join us for a

August 12, 2012

The Ancient Herb – Tulsi

Filed under: herbals and fruit blends,Tea and Health,Tea Classes — wbwingert @ 8:20 am
Tulsi

Tulsi is cultivated for religious and medicinal purposes, and for its essential oil

Tulsi, which is Sanskrit for “the incomparable one”, has claimed a significant place in Ayurveda, an ancient holistic medical system where it is also known as “Holy Basil”. For more than 3000 years, Tulsi has been considered one of India’s most powerful herbs and it is believed that the daily use of this herb helps maintain the balance of the energy centers (chakras) of the body. Indian folk medicine uses the Tulsi leaves to brew a tea which is given to treat congestion, stomach upsets, headaches, fevers and infections.

Today, there has been a significant amount of both animal and human clinical research studies on the benefits of Tulsi and we now know that this versatile plant is an adaptogen (herbs which help the body cope and adapt to external/ internal stressors) with great restorative powers. The plant’s chemistry is very complex and contains hundreds of phyto-chemicals. These phyto-chemicals work synergistically to support the body’s own healing system. Some of its benefits include:

  • Stress relief
  • Enhanced immunity and stamina
  • Support during cold season
  • Promotion of a healthy metabolism
  • Anti-oxidant activity

Some of Tulsi effects you will feel immediately. For example, you may feel more relaxed and energized after the first cup, while others develop gradually over time, such as increased metabolism and stronger immune function. For maximum benefits, it is recommended to drink Tulsi regularly over an extended period of time.

Although Tulsi has many specific effects on different body systems, its main benefits arise from its impressive general capacity to assist the body’s natural process of healing and maintaining health. Tulsi overall health promotion and disease prevention effects are powerful, but often subtle. For example, you may simply notice that you do not seem to be bothered by stress or common illnesses, such as colds or flu, nearly as often as before. Or you may notice that you generally tire less easily.

Tulsi is generally regarded as safe and can be taken over extended periods of time. To make an herbal infusion, use 1 tsp of dried leaf to 6oz of boiling water and steep covered for five to ten minutes. For best results, drink 2-3 cups daily.

May 12, 2012

Herb Day and Adaptogens

Filed under: herbals and fruit blends,Newsletter,Tea and Health,Tea Classes — wbwingert @ 3:34 pm
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Herb Day

Adaptogens

Tea in Health News

 

 

Featured Products

Need something different

for Mom – we have it…

MOM – the tea – a blend of

oolong, rose, and passionfruit

She’ll love you for it

 


Astragulus helps your body

cope with everyday stress

Overdo it?  Try our

Tulsi Detox or Balance

herbal blends to set

things right

 

Looking for a high

quality decaf green

tea?  Our Organic

Sencha Decaf is it

A fine Japanese

Tea gently decaffeinated

Check out the

new teas for

Summer on out

Latest Tea Menu

 

Please visit our

Newest partner

in Tea

32nd Shea

32ndShea is

a new bistro

in Phoenix

 

 

 

 

Many people are looking for more natural ways to maintain and improve their health.  Herbals can be a simple, tasty way to support your body’s health.  May 5th is National Herb Day and a good time to get to know more about the herbal world to find out what works for you and how to enjoy herbs. 

Souvia carries an ever-increasing selection of organic herbals and botanicals, but unlike tea, they all have different properties that can be confusing to understand.  While many herbs are tonics, some do require more awareness of potential interactions.

  • May 5th is National Herb Day – stop in to learn about new herbs and get 20% off of any of our organic herbals and botanicals – Can”t get in? use code HERBDAY on line to get the same deal
  • New Hours – We are open at 9am and stay open until 7pm Monday-Friday, no change to our Saturday hours 9am-5pm
  • The Next Tea Tuesday at ASU’s Kerr Cultural Center is Tuesday May 1st at 9:30am – Free Tea and Music
  • Sign up now for Adaptogens: Nature’s stress busters on Sunday, April 22nd at 2:00pm – learn about natural herbs that help with stress
  • Of course, May 13th is Mother’s Day
    • We have a special blend for Mom – Mother’s Love

 

 

Adaptogens – Nature’s Stress Busters

 

 

We all deal with stress every day – hectic schedules, lack of sleep, demands at the work place or in school – our world has become increasingly more complex. We are constantly bombarded with information via TV, cell phones and the internet, and the majority of it is negative, fueling worries and anxiety. Assaults on our senses create a physical and emotional reaction, an overwhelming feeling we call STRESS!

 

For the 20th consecutive year, April has been designated Stress Awareness Month. Sponsored by the Health Resource Network (HRN),  Health care professionals and health promotion experts across the country will join forces to increase public awareness about both the causes and cures for our modern stress epidemic.

While our bodies strive to adapt to the stresses in our live and keep us balanced and healthy, it is the consistent exposure to stressors that eventually leads to physical symptoms such as:

  • dizziness
  • frequent bouts of low blood sugar
  • mood and memory problems
  • headaches
  • salt and sugar cravings
  • morning fatigue, low energy

In nature we find a category of herbs called adaptogens which can help the human body adapt to stress, support normal metabolic processes, and restore balance. They increase the body’s resistance to physical, biological, emotional, and environmental stressors and promote normal physiological function. They can provide a defense response to acute or chronic stress and are unique from other substances in their ability to restore the balance of endocrine hormones and strengthen the immune system.

 

Adaptogenic ;erbs have been used for thousands of years in ancient India and China. In the past, they have been called rejuvenating herbs, qi tonics, rasayanas or restoratives. Modern research has substantiated what the ancients knew, that many of these herbs are important medicines that can be used for the prevention and treatment of a variety of common ailments.

 

Learn more about Astragalus, Tulsi (Holy Basil) and Eleuthero are some of the herbs that are considered Adaptogens on the blog

 

 

Ask Souvia

 

 

More questions on all things tea

How much tea do I need for a cup?

We recommend about 2 grams for every 6oz of water. Fortunately, this works out to about a level teaspoon for most teas.

Can I leave my tea steeping for longer than the recommended time to get more antioxidants?

Sure, it’s your tea.  Seriously, this will make for a bitter brew and usually cause one to add lots of sugar and/or milk to counteract.  Just steep it for the recommended time – you’ll get plenty of the good stuff.

With the teas that can be steeped more than once like some oolongs, what should I do with the leaves in-between steepings?

Once the leaves are out of the water, they should be fine just on the counter.  We do not usualy keep them overnight or in the fridge but the leaves should be fine for 24 hours, give or take.

Still have questions write us at info@souvia.com or see the FAQ or the Blog

 

 

Thanks for Reading…

 

 

Thanks for reading this month.  Hope you found a nugget or two to take away.  Remember, slow down and enjoy a cup of tea or herbal infusion.  We hope you’ll visit us in the store, at one of our partners or online soon.  If you can’t get in, remember… we ship orders over $50 for free the same day and your tea will arrive quickly!

 

November 22, 2011

Holidays, Gotcha, Matcha, In the Store

Filed under: Black Tea,Newsletter,Tea and Health,Tea Classes,Tea Culture — wbwingert @ 12:50 pm
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Holidays


Gotcha Matcha

In the store

 

 

Featured Teas

 

Cranberry Peach is a crisp

refreshing cup of goodness

 

Holiday Delight is back –

last years’ best seller

What would Thanksgiving be

without Pumpkin Pie!

Overdo it?  Try our

Tulsi Detox or Balance

herbal blends to set

things right

Latest Tea Menu

 

Please visit our

Newest partner

in Tea

32nd Shea

32ndShea is

a new bistro

in Phoenix

 

 

 

 

Holidays

 

 

Happy Thanksgiving all…

  • New Hours – Effective 1 November 2011 we will open at 9am andstay open later until 7pm Monday-Friday,no change to our Saturday hours 9am-5pm
  • We will be open 9am-7pm this Friday with special sale prices.  After shopping all night stop in to relax
  • We will be open 12pm-5pm Sunday December 4th, 11th, and 18th
  • Free gift wrap or free shipping on all purchases over $50
  • New products – Tea Sac clips and Double Walled glass mugs keep your tea warm on cool fall mornings
  • Lots of new teas and great gift ideas

 

 

Gotcha Matcha

 

 

Making matcha is a complex processMatcha, the finely milled, emerald green tea powder, has been used in the traditional Japanese Tea Ceremony for centuries. In modern times, matcha has also been used to flavor and color foods such as soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of Japanese sweets. In the west, matcha found its way into smoothies and lattes and is popular because of its rich taste and multitude of healthy nutrients.


How is it made?

While tea is produced in different countries throughout the world, matcha is unique to Japan. It is grown by local farmers using traditional methods from growing to milling. Matcha is made from shade-grown tea leaves used to make gyokuro. The preparation of matcha  starts several weeks before the harvest, when the tea plants are covered with bamboo mats or tarp in order to reduce the exposure to sunlight, and thereby increasing the chlorophyll  content in the plant. It is the high chlorophyll content  that gives matcha its distinctly green color. After plucking , the leaves are laid out flat to dry. During the drying process the leaves will crumble somewhat and are known as tencha. Tencha is then de-veined, de-stemmed and stone milled into a fine, bright green matcha powder.  Only ground tencha can be called matcha.  Powdered green teas made from other varietals, like sencha, are known as konacha –literally meaning “powder tea”. The most famous matcha producing tea regions in Japan are Uji in Kyoto, Nishio in Aichi, Shizuoka and northern Kyushu.

read more in the blog

What is so good about matcha?

How do I make it?

 

 

It’s the Season

 

 

Where else can you sit and relax with a cup of tea while caring staff prepare gifts for you?  Nowhere but Souvia of course.

We take the stress out of gift-buying by helping you create the personal, unique gifts.

We have tea samplers, starter sets, chocolates and more.

So, stop in or call – we will put together your gift and even ship it for you!

What could be easier!

 

 

Thanks for Reading…

 

 

Thanks for reading this month.  We are wishing everyone a happy, relaxing Thanksgiving. We hope you’ll visit us in the store, at one of our partners or online soon.  If you can’t get in, remember… we ship orders over $50 for free the same day and your tea will arrive quickly!

 

June 24, 2011

World Tea Expo 2011

Filed under: Newsletter,Tea Classes — wbwingert @ 11:24 am

We are at our 6th World Tea Expo in Las Vegas. This show brings together a

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hundreds of vendors and tea specialists under one roof – we are taking classes, delivering a class, a tasting LOTS of tea

More to come

May 20, 2011

Summertime, Cupping and Ask Souvia

Filed under: Black Tea,Newsletter,Phoenix,Tea and Health,Tea Classes,Tea Culture — wbwingert @ 10:36 am

 

Unable to view this newsletter?
 

 

Summertime


Cupping Tea


Ask Souvia


 

 

 


Take your Tea

wherever you go

Tea Survival Kit!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Iced Tea?

 

Our Iced Tea Kit has

everything you need for

iced tea except the ice!

See it in action.

 

Like the Caffeine?

 

 

Latest Tea Menu

Please visit our

newest partner

in Tea

 

Two locations

 

 

 

 

 

Summertime…

 

Summer’s almost here, that means changes all ’round – temps rise, kids get out of school, vacations, etc.  No different at Souvia, we’ll say bye for now to Caramel apple, Hot Tamale, Mojito, Kenilworth, and Cranberry Peach.  Joining us will be Organic Lemon Verbena and refreshing herb just in time for National Iced Tea Month.


Coming up in June:

 

  • We have Music on Saturday June 4th from 2-4pm – Scottish,  Irish and Israeli!
  • Spring Fling, Sencha Lavender Mint, and Mango Dream have hit the shelves
  • Tour Focused tasting this Month is Green Tea – stop by on June 18th to learn more
  • Father’s Day is June 19th – How about some Manly Tea?

 

 

The Art of Cupping

 

Just like wine connoisseurs, tea aficionados appreciate the differences in flavor and aroma of the over 3000 different tea varieties.

While some tea-drinkers prefer the consistency of a blend, such as English Breakfast, others enjoy the fluctuations in character of a single origin tea, which is influenced by seasonal changes, early or late harvest, elevation and soil quality.

 


Regardless of our preference, the tea quality is very important and experienced tea tasters spent countless hours evaluating the leave style, aroma and taste of teas. What the “nose” is to the perfume industry, the “tea taster” is to the tea industry.

Tea tasting, or cupping, is a very structured process during which the quality of the dry and infused leaf is examined, as well as the color and aroma of the liquor and finally the taste of the infusion.

 

Read the 4 steps on our blog

 

 

Ask Souvia….

 

Periodically, we publish questions and answers to tea related questions we receive.  This month:


What is “cold-steeping” Tea?


When making Iced tea there are two basic methods, cold and hot steeping.  With Hot Steeping one prepares the tea as you would for a hot cup.  The downside is that the tea must be allowed to cool or it will dilutes when poured over ice.  A tick is to add about 50% more tea and then put it over ice… this will make the perfect tasting cup


Cold Steeping takes longer but does not require heating water.


Souvia recommends the following basic steps to make iced tea:

  • Use cool water
  • Allow 1 teaspoon of tea or Rooibos for every 6 ounces of water (for a half gallon use 10 teaspoons)
  • Let the tea and water “steep” for 4-6 hours or overnight in the fridge
  • Pour the tea through a strainer to remove the leaves(or use a T-sac)
  • Enjoy your tea!

 

Thanks for Reading…

 

Thanks for reading this month.  Our tea loves to travel -  Take Souvia Teas on vacation and send us a picture!   A picture of a bag of tea, travel mug, etc will work.   Everyone who posts a picture our teas on Facebook or Twitter (@souviatea) of our tea on vacation gets 50g of any of or fruit flavored tea.   The best picture will get a $25 Souvia Gift card!   Runs through August 1st.

 

We hope you’ll visit us in the store, at one of our partners or online soon.  If you can’t get in, remember… we ship orders over $50 for free the same day and your tea will arrive quickly!

 

 

 

 

July 16, 2010

Trees, Caffeine, and iced Tea

 

Unable to view this newsletter?  
   
 

Teas and Trees

 

Caffeine

 

News

 

 

 

Featured Products

 

2 Liter Iced Tea Maker

makes brewing iced

tea a snap

 

 

Sencha Pina Colada

a summer favorite as

temps rise!

 

 

 

Cordless SmartKettle

heats water fast to

just the right tea

temperature

 

 

Urban Beans in Phoenix

now offer Souvia Teas

brewed in the shop

 

 Got a college bound

student – Set up them

up with the “Dorm Pack

 

 

Latest Tea Menu

 

 

 

 

 

Teas and Trees

 

Kerstin hugs a tree in YosemiteKerstin and I took a nice trip to Yosemite and enjoyed to cool air and huge trees!  We brought along some new teas to try and tested out a new product a “SmartKettle” in our lodge.  The Smart Kettle made tea brewing fast and easy since it heat the water to right temperature.  We liked it som much it is in the store now…

 

As for teas,

  • Hawaiian Breeze will be back soon.
  • Organic Tulsi will join our lineup – we tasted two kinds at the Tea Expo and fell in love with the spicy taste  – We will have both a Purple and Green Tulsi
  • We’ll have a Green Nilgiri on the menu – this is from the famous blue mountian in India but is a green tea, it has a unique flavor just as good as the black teas from that region

Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

White TeaIt seems there is no real consensus among experts on the answer to this question. While some consider it harmful, recent studies praise its potential health benefits. 

 

Fact is that caffeine is a bitter substance, naturally occurring in some plants as their protective measure against insects and microbes – a natural pesticide! In the human body, caffeine increases metabolism and stimulates the nervous system, which leaves us more alert, feeling less tired and a little more cheerful. Negative effects such as heart palpitations, headaches and sleeplessness are typically the result of too much caffeine or sensitivity to it. For most people, though, the moderate consumption of caffeine is not harmful.

Truth is also, that the level of caffeine in your favorite drinks varies greatly and that not all caffeine is created equal.  Let’s take a closer look at the makeup and effects of caffeine in your cup of tea:

 

How much is in my cup? 

This is one of the most asked questions we get. The answer is: “It depends”. A variety of factors determine the caffeine content in the dry tea leaf and in the steeped leaf.

Since caffeine is a pesticide, the younger shoots and leaves have more caffeine than the more mature tea leaves. The type of tea plant, soil texture, climate, and elevation all play a role in how much caffeine the tea leaf produces.

Processing methods also matter when it comes to the caffeine content in your cup. Green and black teas undergo different processing and the oxidation step of black tea production changes the cellular structure of the leaf in such a way that caffeine is more readily available to dissolve in water.

Steeping time and water temperature have a great impact on the caffeine level in your cup as well. Caffeine is water-soluble and the longer it is exposed to water, the more caffeine molecules are released – in short, the longer you steep your tea, the more caffeine you’ll end up with. This explains in part, why your green or white tea tends to have less caffeine than your black tea. The recommended steeping time for most green and white teas is 2-3 minutes, whereas black tea is typically steeped between 3-5 minutes.

 

How does tea compare with other sources of caffeine? 

Due to the many factors contributing to the caffeine content, it is difficult to provide exact measurements. On average, however, an 8 oz cup of black tea has 85 mg caffeine and an 8 oz cup of green tea has 40-60mg of caffeine. In comparison, an 8 oz cup of drip coffee contains 135 mg, a 12oz can of Coke 34mg.

 

 Why does tea give me a lift and not a jolt? 

The caffeine in tea is called theine (tay-eene) and metabolizes differently in the body than the caffeine in coffee. Researchers found, for example, that the high

continued on our blog…..

Current Events

it's hot hydrate with tea 

 

 

 

 

 Here’s what’s current –

  • We know, we know, we have taken forever to get our Fall Class Schedule online  – it’s there now!
  • Thanks to everyone who took the pledge to support local businesses during Independent’s Week  
  • In addition to the SmartKettle and Iced Tea maker we also carry a simple electric kettle now. The feedback has been very positive on these time savers
  • More good news for tea drinkers and their hearts
  • Got a college-bound student – How about the our “Dorm Pack?” – a Zojirushi water boiler , Tea Magic, and Mug with your choice of any 3 flavored teas – $189.99 (saves $15 off of regular price AND the Zoji’s work well with college staples like Ramen and Oatmeal

Thanks for Reading…

Everyone did pretty well on the geography question last month.  This month we are offering an 50g of Tulsi, Hawaiian Breeze or Green Niligiri for three people who answer the following question.  What is another name for Tulsi?  Send your answers to info@souvia.com .  We had 3 winners last month for the Yoga Pura Certificates.  I will draw 3 winners this month…

 

We hope you’ll visit us in the store, at one of our partners or online soon.  If you can’t get in, remember… we ship same day and your tea will arrive quickly!

 

 
   


September 8, 2008

New Class – “Healing Menopausal Symptoms Naturally”

Filed under: Tea Classes,Tea in Arizona — Administrator @ 10:31 am

“Healing Menopausal Symptoms Naturally”?

?

Dr. James Moore, DOM, L.A.C. is nationally board-certified in herbology and acupuncture, specializing in Traditional Chinese Medicine.?

He will discuss natural, safe and effective methods to heal menopausal symptoms including night sweats, hot flashes, emotional changes, dryness and lowered libido. His techniques involve the use of nutrition, herbal formulas and supplements?

For more information on Dr. James Moore, visit his website at www.herbalconsults.com?

June 20, 2007

Level III Certification – Passed!

Filed under: Tea and Health,Tea Classes,Tea Culture — Administrator @ 5:13 pm

Gail, Bret and Kerstin successfully completed the Black Tea portion of the Specialty Tea Institute’s Certification Program.? This intensive series of courses seek to allow Tea Purveyors to expand their tea knowledge and demonstrate that knowledge via an examination at the end.

To our customers it means that you can rely on Souvia to always have up-to-date information on tea sources, processing, health benefits, and to put it to use to help you choose the right tea!

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