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December 15, 2010

Spirit of Tea, Boston Tea Party

Filed under: Tea in Arizona — wbwingert @ 10:24 am

 

   
   
 

That Time of Year

 

The Spirit of tea

 


 

Featured Items

 

Elegant Three Tin

Holiday Sampler

 

 

Holiday Delight is a

wonderful blend of tea,

citrusand spices

 

A bestseller – the ever

popular Nutcracker Suite

is ready for steeping!

 

Culinary Tea: More Than

150 Recipes, Steeped in

Tradition from Around the

World

 

Please visit our New

Souvia Tea Partner

Market Bistro carries

Souvia Iced and Hot Tea

 

Latest Tea Menu

 


 

 

 

 

It’s that time of year….

 

 

Christmas? No, of course, I mean the Boston Tea Party where all that good tea was wasted dooming Americans to drink bad tea for centuries!

 

Here’s more of what’s on this month:

  • To Celebrate the Anniversary of the Boston Tea Party we’ll pay the tax on all tea products sold on December 13th
  • We are open Sunday, December 12th and 19th for your convenience
  • We will have music in the store on December 12th 2-4pm, December 17th 4-6pm and December 18th 3-5pm.  Enjoy the traditional holiday music and a cup of tea while we fill your Tea shopping needs
  • We continue to seek more re-usable options for tea – it’s better than recyclables!

The Spirit of Tea


December – the last month of the year – is filled with activities and preparations for the holidays. It is the time to enjoy get-togethers with family and friends, for festivities and shopping, as well as for stillness, peace, harmony and reflection.

Harmony, reflection, peace, wellness and respect are characteristics I associate with tea.

Tea has much more to offer than the obvious flavor and it requires your attention and care if you want to enjoy a perfect cup. This attentiveness stretches from the cultivation of the tea bushes to the harvest of the tender shoots and leaves to the carefully monitored processing steps which transform the fresh leaves into a wide variety of white, green, oolong and black teas. The tea master, who watches over this process meticulously, is said to add the spirit to the tea that will take us on an imaginary journey from the first sip to the last.

Since its discovery about 5000 years ago in China, tea has journeyed around the globe and each culture that came to experience its effect on body and mind, seems to have created a special way to prepare, serve and enjoy it.

China is said to be the birthplace of tea and it is still an integral part of its culture. It is the drink the bride has to prepare for her mother-in-law on her wedding day to demonstrate that she is worthy of her son; it accompanies the dead to the afterlife so that they may not go thirsty; it is the first thing a guest or customer is offered upon entering a home or store and it is used as a means to apologize and to reconcile differences. (Be sure to know your tea so that you can tell by the quality of the tea served how sincere the apology truly is!). A very popular way to serve tea is called “Gong Fu”.  Gong Fu means skill derived through practice and experience. Using special tea pots and tiny cups, this kind of tea preparation focuses on the quality of the tea itself, the labor it took to create it and the enjoyment that is shared with a friend.

Japan was first introduced to tea by Buddhist monks who…  Continued on our Blog

Last Minute Reminders

Tick TockWe know everyone is busy this time of year so we’ll keep it short.

 

Just some quick reminders:

  • We have our annual in-store drawing for a great Tea Gift Basket – Get a chance to win every time you spend $50 – Drawing is on the 22nd
  • We are open Sunday, December 12th and 19th, we close at 3pm on Christmas Eve and New Years’ Eve
  • We’re open 7am-6pm (normal times) December 27th-30th
  • Next Year is our 5th Anniversary, we will communicate more on our celebration plans next month

Thanks for Reading…

Thanks for reading this month.  While Tea is a common beverage of choice in the UK, that was not always the case.  What was a common breakfast beverage in England before tea became popular?  Send us your answers to win a Three Tin sampler before Christmas!

 

We hope you’ll visit us in the store, at one of our partners or online soon.  If you can’t get in, remember… we ship same day and your tea will arrive quickly!

 

 
   


December 9, 2010

The Spirit of Tea

Filed under: Tea and Health,Tea Culture,Tea Enjoyment — wbwingert @ 11:40 am

December – the last month of the year – is filled with activities and preparations for the holidays. It is the time to enjoy get-togethers with family and friends, for festivities, shopping as well as for stillness, peace, harmony and reflection.

Harmony, reflection, peace, wellness and respect are characteristics I associate with tea.

Tea has much more to offer than the obvious flavor and it requires your attention and care if you want to enjoy a perfect cup. This attentiveness stretches from the cultivation of the tea bushes to the harvest of the tender shoots and leaves to the carefully monitored processing steps which transform the fresh leaves into a wide variety of white, green, oolong and black teas. The tea master, who watches over this process meticulously, is said to add the spirit to the tea that will take us on an imaginary journey from the first sip to the last.

Since its discovery about 5000 years ago in China, tea has journeyed around the globe and each culture that came to experience its effect on body and mind, seems to have created a special way to prepare, serve and enjoy it.

China is said to be the birthplace of tea and it is still an integral part of its culture. It is the drink the bride has to prepare for her mother-in-law on her wedding day to demonstrate that she is worthy of her son; it accompanies the dead to the afterlife so that they may not go thirsty; it is the first thing a guest or customer is offered upon entering a home or store and it is used as a mean to apologize and to reconcile differences. (Be sure to know your tea so that you can tell by the quality of the tea served how sincere the apology truly is!). A very popular way to serve tea is called “Gong Fu”.  Gong Fu means skill derived through practice and experience. Using special tea pots and tiny cups, this kind of tea preparation focuses on the quality of the tea itself, the labor it took to create it and the enjoyment that is shared with a friend.

Japan was first introduced to tea by Buddhist monks who traveled from China and who appreciated tea’s invigorating effect that kept them from falling asleep during hours of meditation. The Japanese made tea the center of an aesthetic ritual featuring the serving and drinking of matcha, a powdered tea. This very detailed ceremony was developed under the influence of Zen Buddhism and has its focus on the appreciation of simplicity, beauty and harmony.

Turkey, Russia, Morocco, has their own ways of preparing and serving tea. Instead of cups, tea is served in glasses with loads of sugar or marmalade as is the custom in Russia. Tea is an important part in the social life of these countries and the beautiful silver tea pots and samovars used to prepare and serve it to friends and guests are a reflection of its status within the culture.

England and the rest of Western Europe had to wait until the mid 1600 before they had their first encounter with tea. However once discovered, it quickly becomes a staple in every household and today it is unthinkable to talk about England without mentioning the age-old tradition of afternoon tea most of us are familiar with.

Whether it is served in fine china, ceramic bowls or painted glasses, all over the world, tea is the symbol of hospitality – the ultimate gesture to demonstrate respect, honor and friendship. It may be served in a store to welcome a customer or to seal a business transaction; it may be served in a social setting to enjoy the company of friends. Where ever you find a group of people gathered around a pot of tea, you may also find spirited conversation, laughter and harmony. Tea turns strangers into friends and it gives as a reprieve, a pause to reflect and to celebrate life’s gifts.

“To the Chinese, tea is like a free spirit. When it enters the body, one is immediately filled with the nutrition of the sunshine, the bright moon, the richness of the land and the wonderment of the universe.”

This holiday season, take time to enjoy a cup of tea with friends and take in the spirit of peace, friendship and communi-tea

A big Thank You to all our wonderful customers, who over the years, have become more like family to us. We appreciate your loyalty and we look forward to seeing all of you throughout the holiday season and in the next year!

Happy Holidays from the Souvia team: Bret, Kerstin, Nombi, Rachel, Zoe S., Zoe D, Alex and Robin

Kerstin Wingert, President of Souvia Tea and passionate chai-wallah!

December 6, 2010

Christmas Punch – Boston Tea Party

Filed under: Green Tea,Tea Enjoyment — wbwingert @ 11:30 am

Today is the anniversary of the Boston Tea Party that destined American’s to drink bad tea for decades!  Here’s a way to get your green tea for the holidays from the Wall Street Journal:

Cool Runnings

Boston Tea Party
From Jim Meehan of New York’s PDT

1 750 ml bottle Banks 5 Island Rum
18 ounces
Sencha Green Tea
1 375ml bottle Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
6 ounces St. Germain Liqueur
½ ounce Bittermens Boston Bittahs

Combine all ingredients and chill in a refrigerator. Serve in a bowl with a large block of ice. Garnish each serving with grated nutmeg.